Behavior & Training

Dog Training for Beginners – How to have the perfect training session!

Hey there!

Here’s another post on dog training for beginners. Dog training can be a long and hard process, especially when you’re working with an older dog who has been taught wrong manners or hasn’t been trained at all. This post is mostly addressed to people who have rescued or bought an older dog and are beginning the process of teaching their pooch some manners.  This post isn’t on teaching actual command or tricks but shows you how to have an easier and more effective training session!

Set rules and boundaries! If you want to have rules remember to set them from the start! Since you don’t want your pooch sitting on the couch, never let him on it. Dogs don’t understand maybe or sometimes. They can either do something always or never, otherwise, they don’t obey your commands. You have to be very strict about following the set rules and never let those big, beautiful eyes fool you 🙂

The timing is key! We all know when to correct our dog but we often forget to praise when he is doing something right. Be sure to remember to praise your pup right after it is corrected. The correction and praise should be impeccable!

Be the leader! You should always be firm. Tell your dog what to do, don’t ask him if he’s feeling like doing it at the moment. If he’s not up for it then show him what you want and tell him once again. Remember, being firm doesn’t mean being rude or aggressive.

Remember to praise! We as dog owners, often focus on correcting our pup and often forget to praise him while he’s doing something good. It’s really important to build a close connection with your dog. It’s really easy to get frustrated with your dog and hard to remember to praise him! This is an observation made by numerous dog trainers. When you’re having trouble with your dog coming back to you, don’t get angry. Instead of being frustrated, praise him once he actually does what you’re asking for. If your do is quietly lying on the floor and chewing a bone or toy, be sure to tell him what a good dog he is!

Stay fair and take it slow! Be fair to your dog. If you’re expecting him to learn a trick or command, show him what you want and help him understand. Once you’re sure that you and your pup are on the same page, begin training! If you see that training isn’t bringing any progress try again. Remember to take things slow, a fast and intensive pace won’t help you with training. Everything takes time so be patient and know that you may need to re-teach some things if you go too fast!

 

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Behavior & Training

The great help of rescue dog

How many times have dogs helped society in any type of situation? Try to think how many times he risks his life to save us! Today I would like talk about rescue dogs to thank them for helping us in dangerous situations we find ourselves!
So, we could continue to speak about his very important task but I’m going to explain to you how training rescue dogs takes place.

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There are only three requirements to become a rescue dog:

– a strong build and personality: to operate in any type of situation, atmospheric condition and task
– a good feeling with his owner: to obtain the total obedience of the dog.
– time: to create the good feeling between dog and owner.

The training of the rescue dog starts when the dog is 4-5 months. The first period is personality’s education. The main activity of this phase is playing because he can socialize with others people and others places.
The second stage is obedience to commands. Starting with “sit”, “on the floor” and “come here” until more difficult. The third step is emotional and mental preparation. This stage happens in a gym and is composed by exercise that allows him to face any type of dangerous situation. The last education phase is searching for missing people thanks to their nose.

So, behind a dog rescue, there is a lot of work but the most important things are surely the love and the confidence that the owner shows them!
Don’t forget, he’ll never betray you!

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